Quarantunes Vol. III: Exploring New Music Amid A Pandemic

By Tom Wickstrom

D.L. Marble
D.L. Marble One Line At A Time

Tom is Matt Wickstrom’s father and former contributor to his own blog, Tie Dyed Tunes. Additionally, Tom also creates a variety of home-made tie-dye clothing and garments including t-shirts, face masks and bath robes. Browse some of his work on Facebook at Wicki’s Tie Dyes. Read Quarantunes Vol. I here and Vol. 2 here.

Nine months into quarantine and there’s still a growing pile of quarantunes for me to sift through. In this third volume of mini album reviews from quarantine I take a look at new music from Thomm Jutz, Justin Farren and D.L. Marble.


Thomm Jutz To Live In Two Worlds Vol. 2″

Back in April of this year, I reviewed Jutz’s To Live In Two Worlds Vol. 1, which offered up compositions with a full band as well as songs with Jutz solo on guitar. On Vol. 2 Jutz returns with 14 additional songs.  His band consists of Tammy Rogers (The Steeldrivers) on fiddle, Mike Compton on mandolin, Justin Moses on dobro and banjo and Mark Fain on bass.

Jutz has a way of weaving historical stories into songs that take a detailed looks back to the past and forward to the present. “The Flood Of 2010” both opens the album with a full band version and closes it out with a solo version of the same song that tells of the historic Nashville floods of 2010. “In This House,” a co-write between Jutz and Rogers, comes off as a danceable murder ballad. “New River Gorge” is an up tempo story of two people that jumped to their death there. “Evening Prayer Blues” tells the story of African-American Grand Ole Opry star Deford Bailey while “Emancipation Blues” is an old-timey sounding song about reconstruction in Georgia after the Civil War. Jutz has a knack for writing songs that are based in history and takes the listener on a journey through through time and it feels like you’re right there with him.

Justin Farren Pretty Free

How would I describe Farren? Positive, upbeat, relaxing. There are 11 tracks on the CD and each one takes the listener on a ride through a time in his mind and based on his life experiences. His lyrical imagination makes it feel as though we’re right there with him. “There’s No Such Thing As A Bad Day” offers a positive and upbeat outlook on life. “My Uncle Bill” reminds me of a favorite uncle of mine. “Two Wheel Drive And Japanese” is a poppy saga about getting in trouble and losing love and learning there’s a fine line between thinking you’re cool and finding out you aren’t. 

D.L. Marble One Line At A Time

Based out of Arizona, Marble puts his personal experiences into songs on his second CD that blend country with rock’n roll seamlessly similar to the Old 97’s. The first track, “Ocean Beach,” offers up a rock’n roll love song that stays strong but transforms (“We walked out on the water and I held you in my arms / This is my favorite new memory / Because it’s you, our son and Ocean Beach”). “One Line At A Time” comes across as a rock’n roll anthem where the experiences of life and being on the road end up in the songs he writes. In “Bombay,” a song about love lost, Marble sings “Wasn’t the first one to get away / Just the first one that I wanted to stay.”  All 10 songs on this CD are very listenable, drawing you in and will inspiring you to crank the volume up loud.


Tom is Matt Wickstrom’s father and former contributor to his own blog, Tie Dyed Tunes. Additionally, Tom also creates a variety of home-made tie-dye clothing and garments including t-shirts, face masks and bath robes. Browse some of his work on Facebook at Wicki’s Tie Dyes. Read Quarantunes Vol. I here and Vol. 2 here.

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